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Offline Asid

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Strategic Command: American Civil War
« on: April 08, 2022, 11:31:35 PM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War
April 07, 2022



For the first time in the series’ history, Strategic Command will be taking you to the 19th century battlefields of the American Civil War.

In this turn-based strategy game, you will control the armies, research, production and diplomatic policy of either the Union or the Confederacy during a time of great innovation and dramatic battles.



Strategic Command: American Civil War is coming soon with a massive 296 x 224 map, covering all of North America from Canada and New Mexico to the Caribbean at a 15km/9mi scale.



This is the largest hex-based map ever offered by the Strategic Command series, 6 campaigns covering the Civil War from first shot to last, new unit types, new technologies, riverine warfare, historical event popups, PBEM++ and much more, check out the product page for full details here.

Strategic Command: American Civil War coming soon and also is looking for beta testers.



Apply here to help us improve the game https://www.matrixgames.com/beta/strategic-command-american-civil-war
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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2022, 11:45:10 PM »
Apply for the beta in the link above.
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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2022, 11:29:31 PM »
Strategic Command American Civil War, will be available on June 30th, 2022



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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2022, 10:58:11 PM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War Out Now on Steam
14 July 2022



Strategic Command will be taking you to the 19th century battlefields of the American Civil War.
In this turn-based strategy game, you will control the armies, research, production and diplomatic policy of either the Union or the Confederacy during a time of great innovation and dramatic battles.

With 6 campaigns covering the Civil War from 1861 to 1864 and new unit types, new technologies, riverine warfare and much more..

Out Now on Steam: https://store.steampowered.com/app/1966130/Strategic_Command_American_Civil_War/
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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2022, 11:19:30 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War - v1.03.00 Update
Thu, September 1, 2022



A new patchfor Strategic Command: American Civil War is now available.
 
In this patch we added and fixed a lot of things such as the German and French translations, game balance and many more things...

Here is the full changelog:

GAME ENGINE

- Fixed a bug that had could have Long Range Transports unload with supply = 11 (Bill Runacre).
- Fixed a unit morale re-calculation relative to overall national Fighting Spirit error, when the Fighting Spirit value was >= 75% and <= 125% (Pocus).
- Fixed an issue where some units being destroyed under 5 supply did not provide the attacker with a Fighting Spirit bonus (Pocus).
- Fixed an HQ attachment range highlight error that did not properly reach all proper in range positions (LoneRunner).
- Fixed a FoW reveal error for enemy naval units hidden on neutral Major coastlines (Bavre).
- Oceanic Gunboats can no longer be deployed in River Ports.
- Windows scaling is now detected and reported in the SETTINGS screen, and listed resolutions will be relative to the current scaling setting as well.
- Forts can now be disbanded when supply >= 5, no MPPs gained. (PvtBenjamin, battlevonwar)
- Mouse hovering over major rives now shows a +1 movement penalty in the Operational information panel (Professor Von-Wulfen).

CAMPAIGNS

1861
- Confederate Gunboats in North Carolina will now spawn one in each of Elizabeth City, New Berne and Wilmington (PvtBenjamin)
- Increased Missouri starting mobilisation to 35% (was 20)
- Saying NO to DE 501 will now shift Missouri 45-55% towards the Union (was 30-40%)

1861, 1861/7

- Marines now cannot be produced until 1861-09-01
- Union AI Marines that arrive in late 1861 are now replaced with Divisions

1862, 1862/T, 1863, 1864

- Corrected WAR ENTRY scripts preventing Mexico from entering upon French intervention (Beriand)

All CW Campaigns

- Corrected several minor map typos
- Added missing railroads connecting Memphis TN-Corinth MS, La Grange TN-Grenada MS and New Albany IN-Louisville KY (eightroomofelixir, Boss Gnome)
- 155,71 (between Richmond and Petersburg) is now a land hex, with fortifications representing the Confederate defences at Drewry's Bluff (Patrat)
- Maximum strength of partisans reduced to 5 (was 8) (gdpsnake)
- Reduced Defence of Marines by 1 against all land unit types
- AI will now receive 100 FS points each turn after 1861-07-01 on Veteran difficulty or higher (Patrat)
- AI will now receive a further 150 FS points each turn after 1861-07-01 on Expert difficulty (Patrat, Pocus)
- Some blockade runner MPPs will now be directed to alternative ports when Confederate ports are captured or disabled via events
- Divisions and Mountain Divisions now receive a +1 defence bonus in Fortified Towns and Fortifications
- Corps now receive a +2 defence bonus in Fortified Towns and Fortifications
- Reduced Union AI prioritisation of Engineer production (Pocus)
- Land defence values of Indians and Cavalry Brigades increased by 0.5
- Increased base Confederate Fighting Spirit to 125000 (was 120000). Starting FS has also been increased in each campaign to reflect this change.
- Confederate FS falls from Union capture of New Orleans, Mobile, Charleston and Norfolk have been reduced. The difference is made up by new events that reduce Confederate FS when the forts in each of these locations are destroyed.
- Confederate FS will now fall when Forts Henry, Donelson, Blakeley, Fisher and Cobb's Point are destroyed.
- Petersburg VA is now an Industrial Centre (Beriand)

OTHER

- Added German and French translation
- Strategy Guides updated


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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2022, 12:01:26 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War - Franco Prussian War free update
Tue Dec 06, 2022



Hello everyone,

along with the release of today’s patch note, we are glad to announce a free DLC for all the owners of Strategic Command: American Civil War, prepare yourselves for the Franco-Prussian War.



Ever since the release of the Franco-Prussian War campaign in Strategic Command 2’s WWI Breakthrough! expansion, this conflict has become one of the most heavily requested campaigns for Strategic Command 3.  Seeing as American Civil War has been designed specifically to cover 19th-century warfare (and was in part inspired by this older campaign), and as a way of saying ‘thank you’ to our loyal fans, we thought that now was the most fitting time to revisit this war.

This is a remastered version of the original Franco-Prussian War campaign released in 2013, incorporating all of the improvements to the game engine over the last ten years while remaining faithful to the original design.  Many of these improvements will be obvious: a hex-based map, improved graphics, dynamic movement and a more capable AI opponent!

To download the update click here

You can read the latest patch note here

Here you can find the latest Dev Diary about the Franco-Prussian War

Enjoy the campaign and let us know what do you think about it.

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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2023, 11:53:28 PM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War – New DLC available on January 26th, 2023
Wed Jan 11, 2023



For the first time in the series history, Strategic Command will have its first DLC, Wars in the Americas.

Strategic Command: American Civil War – Wars in the Americas gives you the opportunity to fight on some of the greatest South American battlefields, ranging from the deserts of Peru to the Jungles of Cuba

Wars in the Americas will be out out on January 26th.

Lead your armies during five epic 19th century conflicts:
1. 1846 The Conquest of Mexico
2. 1863 The Eagle and The Empire
3. 1866 Paraguay Under Siege
4. 1879 Ghosts of the Pacific
5. 1898 Remember the Maine


The DLC will include many new Features:
-   New campaigns covering five major wars between 1846 and 1898
-   New unit types including Field Artillery, Blockhouses, Armored Cruisers and Torpedo Boats
-   New historical leaders including Taylor, Bazaine, Escala, Caxias, Shafter and Scott
-   New events including Santa Anna’s Return from Exile, the Philippine Revolution and the construction of Paraguay’s great ‘Cristiano’ mortar


We can’t wait to show you more soon.


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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2023, 12:02:01 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War - Wars in the Americas - Dev Diary #1
Mon, 16 January 2023



The second half of the 19th century was a time of great change for the Americas.  From Cape Horn to the Sabine River, a new generation of leaders battled for control of the inheritance of Bolivar and San Martin.  Driven by the idea of a manifest destiny, the United States spread its borders from sea to shining sea.  New weapons: the breech-loader, the torpedo boat and the protected cruiser enabled power to be projected on an unprecedented scale.  It was an age that made heroes of men such as Scott, Grau, Caxias and Theodore Roosevelt, and it shaped the fate of the Americas for generations to come.

This makes it the perfect setting for the next chapter in the Strategic Command series.



Wars in North America

When we decided to make additional content for Strategic Command: American Civil War, two conflicts immediately stood out as must-haves for the expansion pack.  One being the Mexican-American War of 1846-48, which has since been represented as a sort of opening act for the story of the Civil War, as many of the war’s most prominent commanders gained their first battlefield experience in Mexico, and the annexation of California reinforced the growing sectional divide between the Northern and Southern states. 

The other is the Spanish-American War of 1898, a conflict that marks the end of the post-Civil War era and the arrival of the United States as a major player on the international stage.  In addition to serving as bookends for the time period covered by the DLC, these two conflicts will require you to adapt to strategic situations very different to those you experienced in the Civil War.

Additionally, we will be revisiting the Civil War itself with 1863 The Eagle and the Empire, an alternate history campaign where France enters the war on the side of the Confederacy.

1846 The Conquest of Mexico

So far in its history, Strategic Command has focused exclusively on industrial warfare: the American Civil War and both World Wars were all conflicts where industrial output was as important to victory as tactical brilliance.  In those conflicts, the warring powers mobilised (and often conscripted) thousands or millions of men to take up arms.  Those vast armies relied on sprawling infrastructure networks to bring supplies and reinforcements to the front, with the telegraph and radio providing commanders the ability to quickly redirect their reserves to turn the tide of battle.

In turning the clock back to the 1840s, we may not be going to a truly pre-industrial age, but at this point in history the innovations that enabled the successes of Sherman, Pershing and Patton had yet to spread to the plains of northern Mexico.  While those commanders could request reinforcements with a quick message, your armies will be on their own.



Or at the very least, reinforcements will be scarce.  Compared with the Civil War, the armies of the Mexican War are tiny: Scott’s army for the capture of Mexico City was just 20,000 strong, or about as many men who were killed or wounded at the Battle of Antietam alone.  Even fewer of these soldiers are professionals, with years of training and experience.  These Regular units will be your most valuable asset in battle, but they will also be irreplaceable if lost, so how and when you commit them to battle may well prove the difference between victory and defeat.



Fortunately, you will not be solely reliant on the Regulars to win the day, and volunteer Brigades will be available for purchase to bolster your ranks, although they come at the cost of lower combat effectiveness.  Before they can challenge Zachary Taylor or Santa Anna in battle however, they will first have to overcome perhaps the most important challenge in this campaign: the sheer distance between your objectives. 

Even before setting foot on Mexican soil, Taylor’s camp on the Rio Grande is already a thousand kilometres from his supply centre in New Orleans, while other American forces plan to go even further, to New Mexico and California.  Without railroads to transport them, your armies will be forced to travel these vast distances on foot (or occasionally via steamboat).  Success in this war will depend not on your ability to mobilise reinforcements from afar, but on your mastery of great distances and ability to win battles with whatever forces are on hand.



One of the more interesting stories I came across while researching this conflict relates to an industrial innovation not typically associated with warfare, namely the steam-powered printing press.  Invented in 1843, it allowed literature to be published in quantities that would have previously seemed unthinkable.

One of the first works to benefit from this invention was William Hickling Prescott’s History of the Conquest of Mexico, which recounts the story of the sixteenth-century war between the Spanish conquistadores and the Aztec Empire.  For many Americans in the 1840s, this was their first introduction to their southern neighbour, and it has been argued that Prescott’s work helped inspire the United States to go to war with Mexico in 1846 (Ironically, Prescott himself was opposed to the war), and many American soldiers carried the book with them into battle as they followed in the footsteps (quite literally) of Hernando Cortes.

We’re giving you the option to do this too: on turn one, the American player will be offered a Decision, allowing them to “bring a copy of the book on campaign”.  If you say YES, you will begin each turn with a popup that includes an excerpt from the book, allowing you to follow Cortes’ story as you attempt your own Conquest of Mexico. And yes, that’s where the campaign gets its name.



1898 Remember the Maine

The Spanish-American War has a reputation for being a rather one-sided affair, and for good reason.  The two major naval battles – Manila Bay and Santiago – saw the Spanish fleets sunk in their entirety while the Americans suffered a total of two dead and ten wounded.  On land, US forces occupied Manila and Santiago within weeks of landing, captured Guam without a fight, and had wrested control of half of Puerto Rico before an armistice was declared.



Outside of Havana and a few isolated garrisons, the remainder of Spain’s colonial possessions were no longer controlled by the Spanish crown, but by native partisans determined to secure the independence of their nations.  These partisans had been actively fighting Spain since 1895 with growing success, and by 1898 it was the rebels who effectively controlled most of Cuba and the Philippines. 

When the Maine exploded on February 15, 1898, Spain was entering a war that it could not win. But while the Spanish could not win the Spanish-American War, the United States could certainly lose it. 



Although the Spanish colonial garrisons had been hardened by years of partisan warfare, the US Army has improved little since 1865, still relying on volunteers who are eager to fight but poorly trained.  The logistics system that would bring them to Cuba was shambolic, with multiple units being assigned to the same transport, and supply distribution reached the point of scandal, as low-quality “embalmed beef” added food poisoning to the soldiers’ woes.  The American medical system was equally abysmal, a recipe for disaster in yellow fever-ridden Cuba.  Adding to Washington’s problems is Kaiser Wilhelm II, who desires Spain’s overseas possessions for himself.

For the Spanish-American War we have divided the map into five different sectors, representing the Philippines, California, Florida and the Caribbean, the Canary Islands and mainland Spain.  While units can move from one sector to another via marked loop boxes on the map, the sheer distance between sectors means that once your forces are committed to one sector, sending them to another will not be easily done.



More than ever, this means that carefully planning your campaigns ahead of time will be vital to your eventual victory.  For the American side to win, they must capture three of five objectives: Manila, San Juan in Puerto Rico, and Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago in Cuba.  Amphibious invasions targeting Guam and the Canary Islands can further reduce Spain’s Fighting Spirit. 

Spain meanwhile must simply survive with enough Fighting Spirit intact until the end of 1898, at which point it is assumed that Germany intervenes, either to negotiate an honourable peace settlement, or seize Spain’s empire for the Kaiser.  With so many objectives spread out across the world, you must decide which sectors to prioritise, and these are decisions that will have to be made before the war has begun.

That is, before the Spanish-American War has begun.  At the time the campaign begins in early February 1898, Spain has been long engaged in a partisan war against the Cubans, and how you handle these partisans will be just as important as anything Uncle Sam might achieve.  For the Americans, Cuban (and later, Filipino) forces, while weak in raw combat power, can provide major advantages, from spotting the Spanish forces to cutting enemy supply lines.  If native forces are able to capture Spanish arsenals and warehouses, in the form of supply centres, it will be a major boon to American forces on the islands.



Spain meanwhile must decide how much effort to spend on suppressing the partisans versus preparing for the eventual American invasions.  While spreading the Spanish army across the colonies allows it to greatly reduce (though never eliminate) partisan uprisings, and increase the amount of MPPs that the colonies send back to Madrid, you risk leaving too few forces guarding the coast against the likes of Theodore Roosevelt and the Rough Riders.



1863 The Eagle and the Empire

While the leaders of the new states in Latin America correctly feared that Spain would attempt to regain some of their former colonies, it would not be Spain that would make the greatest effort to reassert European control over the Americas, but rather France’s Emperor, Napoleon III. 

Taking advantage of the Civil War in the United States (and thus Lincoln’s inability to enforce the Monroe Doctrine), Napoleon III ordered his army to occupy the Mexican port of Veracruz in December 1861.  Assisted by some Mexican conservatives, Napoleon and his army installed the Habsburg prince Maximilian as Emperor of Mexico and had overrun most of the country by 1865, before being pressured by Andrew Johnson’s administration to withdraw the following year.



While this campaign has already been represented as a possibility in our American Civil War campaigns, the requirement of French intervention in the war means that players have thus far only been able to play it for the few turns between intervention and a likely Confederate victory.  Given how interesting the history of this war was, we felt it was worthy of a full campaign!

In The Eagle and the Empire, France declares war on the United States in the spring of 1863, which causes the American Civil War and Napoleon’s Mexican adventure to expand into a massive international conflict.

Rather than prompting Lincoln to sue for peace, the French attack causes the Union public to rally around their flag and behind their President, while French aid and the promise of reinforcements increases both the Confederacy’s Fighting Spirit and its ability to fight on.  To give you sufficient time to achieve victory in this epic conflict, this campaign will extend until December 1866, a full year longer than the base American Civil War campaigns.

Beginning in May 1863, this campaign thrusts you straight into the action!



Not only has Lee just triumphed at Chancellorsville and is preparing to strike towards Gettysburg, but in Mexico General Forey has won an equally important victory by concluding the Siege of Puebla, leaving little to resist an advance on Mexico City itself.  Meanwhile, Grant has outflanked the fortress of Vicksburg and is preparing to lay siege to the last Confederate position on the Mississippi River. 

This campaign provides lots of new strategic options. The expulsion of Confederate forces from New Mexico leaves the Union with a dilemma: should the army victorious in New Mexico cross the border to support President Juarez against the French, or are they more urgently needed to defeat the Confederacy?



The arrival of the French Navy will also force you to rethink the war at sea.  Not only will Napoleon’s ironclads – perhaps the finest warships of their day – severely complicate the enforcement of the Union blockade (at least until the Union can acquire more ironclads of its own), but they also allow the French player to deploy a large expeditionary force to North America. 



This well-trained force is equipped with the finest weapons available, and will be sure to make a difference wherever it is sent: perhaps you will open a second front in Mexico to split Juarez’ overstretched forces?  Maybe you will send them to reinforce Lee or relieve Pemberton at Vicksburg?  You may even wish to consider a daring attack along the Union’s coast, with an invasion unmatched in its ambition and its potential glory...

Strategic Command: American Civil War - Wars in the Americas will be available on January 26th 2023

Keep in touch with the community of Strategic Command, use the forum to discuss your discoveries with other users, check out the site for FaQ and any information, and join the Discord server where the Dev regularly updates the users about the development progress and discusses requests and changes.


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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2023, 12:13:18 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War - Wars in the Americas - Dev Diary #2
Mon, 23 January 2023



Wars in South America

Across its twenty year history, Strategic Command has explored a diverse range of battlefields, with campaigns ranging from the mountains of East Africa, to the islands of the Pacific, to the frozen plains of Russia.  Thus far however, the series has never included a campaign set in South America (with the exception of the continent playing a minor role in WWII: World at War, of course).

The late 19th century was a defining time in South America’s history: mere decades after declaring independence from Spain and Portugal, the continent’s new nations came into frequent conflict as they battled for control of South America’s future.  To complete the Wars in the Americas expansion, we have included campaigns exploring two South American conflicts that we found to be particularly interesting: the Paraguayan War, and the War of the Pacific.



South America’s today.  In the 1860s, many of these borders were unmarked and heavily disputed.

1866 Paraguay Under Siege

Many fortifications have been compared to the mighty walls of Gibraltar: Metz, Sevastopol, Vicksburg and Callao among others, but few have been so deserving of the title as Humaita.  Situated just north of the Argentine border, Humaita controlled the sole accessible route into Paraguay.  The fortress itself was at the top of some steep cliffs on the left bank of the Paraguay River looking over a horseshoe bend in the river: any approaching vessels would have to contend not only with Humaita’s guns but also the rushing current.  On land it was surrounded by swamps, lagoons and mudflats – the trackless, unmapped carrizal – creating a position thought to be impregnable.  Indeed it was so strong a position that in 1864 Paraguay’s Marshal-President Francisco Solano Lopez felt confident in abandoning half a century of strict Paraguayan non-intervention to embark on a war with Brazil and Argentina, setting the stage for one of history’s greatest sieges.



By May 1866, the point at which this campaign begins, the Paraguayan War was eighteen months old.  Most of Lopez’ professional army had been destroyed or captured, and whatever unlikely prospect he might have had to convincingly win the war by marching on Buenos Aires had long passed.  What remained was a small, badly outgunned force (while the Brazilians had modern rifles, Lopez’ men were equipped mostly with Brown Bess muskets dating back to the previous century), but one whose determination bordered on the fanatic.



Paraguay therefore possesses several advantages despite their desperate position.  Most notably, Paraguayan infantry can build fortifications (and do this much more quickly than engineers in other campaigns), and doing so is frequently a matter of survival in face of a greatly superior foe.  The geography of the area also greatly favours the defensive, as it is filled with endless swamps, lagoons and smaller streams, each of which can be utilised to make a stronger position.  Furthermore, as the region has never been mapped, the Paraguayans know the geography of the land far better than their opponents, which we have represented by giving their infantry an additional hex of spotting range.



The Triple Alliance – Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay – make up for this with a very powerful advantage of their own: all Allied infantry receive a minimum supply of 3, making it impossible for them to be cut off and destroyed for lack of supply.  Historically, Paraguay’s power projection capabilities by this point in the war had become virtually non-existent, and their armies too small (and themselves too poorly supplied), to enforce an effective encirclement.  On a map where each hex represents less than half a kilometre, the Allies will be able to fight wherever they can get their forces.



In order to achieve victory in this war, you will need to take full advantage of your side’s unique abilities, while preventing your opponent from doing the same.



1879 Ghosts of the Pacific

From a war where the two sides could not have been more different, we now look at one where they could not be more evenly matched.  In the War of the Pacific (no, not the conflict between Japan and the United States!), Chile and Peru both had starting armies of around 5,000 men, two ironclads, long coastlines and virtually no logistics or medical units supporting their forces.  Chile had a small technological advantage, but Peru made up for this with its greater manpower pool, as well as assistance from its ally Bolivia.



For two sides so evenly matched then, why did Chile win almost every engagement in this war, and eventually occupy Lima in 1881?

To answer that, we will be flipping conventional strategy on its head for this campaign.  Typically, control of land is a prerequisite for control of the sea: in the Civil War, it is control of ports such as Cape Hatteras, Port Royal and Fort Pickens that enable the Union to blockade the Confederacy; in World War II it is the occupation of France that enables U-boats to raid the British convoys, and control of Pacific islands that enables aircraft to locate and bomb enemy warships.

In the War of the Pacific however, it is control of the sea that is a prerequisite for control of the land.  Chile, Bolivia and Peru were heavily reliant on the export of minerals: principally copper, silver and nitrates, in order to run their economies, and as neither had much in the way of domestic arms production, imports were vital to sustain their war efforts.  Limited infrastructure and difficult terrain in the Atacama Desert also prevent supplies from reaching your troops via an overland route, making control of the seas essential for success on land in a more direct sense as well (the game is more forgiving than history was, with overland supply being possible, if less effective, in the event that a forward position is placed under blockade).



A more concise answer to the question of Chile’s victory can be given in one word: Independencia.  This was the name of one of Peru’s two ironclads (or four, if we count two ageing monitors), which ran aground a mere three months after the beginning of the war, depriving Peru of perhaps its most valuable naval asset.  As the loss of this ship was the result of a dreadful accident and keeping Independencia in the fight gives a more balanced experience, unmarked reefs will play no part in the campaign. It is therefore likely that the duels between Independencia and Huascar on the Peruvian side, and Blanco Encalada and Almirante Cochrane on the Chilean, will play a key part in your strategy – at least initially.



The War of the Pacific also marked the effective battlefield debut for two innovations that played a major role in warfare during the following decades.  The first is the torpedo boat, which although smaller and less well armoured than an ironclad, is a fast vessel capable of dealing significant damage to enemy ships (something the Russian Navy would learn to its great cost 25 years later), as well as being ideal for enforcing a blockade of South America’s long Pacific coast.  The other is the modern landing craft, first used at Pisagua in November 1879: if transporting supplies across the Atacama is merely extremely difficult, marching an army overland will be doubly so, while amphibious operations will give you even more ways to haunt your opponents.



Conclusion

That wraps up our series of Dev Diaries, and we hope you enjoyed this first look at the Wars in the Americas expansion.  As always, thanks for your comments and suggestions, and for helping us continue to improve the series!

The Wars in the Americas expansion to Strategic Command: American Civil War will be available for purchase on Thursday 26th January 2023.

Keep in touch with the community of Strategic Command, use the forum to discuss your discoveries with other users, check out the site for FaQ and any information, and join the Discord server where the Dev regularly updates the users about the development progress and discusses requests and changes.
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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2023, 01:13:29 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War – Wars in the Americas is out now.
Thu, 26 January 2023




For the first time in the history of the series we are proud to announce the release of the first DLC for Strategic Command.




Strategic Command: Wars in the Americas gives you the opportunity to fight five new campaigns covering some of the greatest conflicts of the mid/late 19th century.  Including battlefields ranging from the deserts of Peru to the jungles of Cuba, these campaigns will provide countless hours of entertainment while challenging your strategic skills to the utmost!

This DLC contains five major wars, new unit types, new historical leaders, new events and so much more.
Don’t miss out: Strategic Command: American Civil War will be at a discount of 10% off for a few days, but this offer won’t last. Grab your copy now to take advantage of this release offer.

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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2023, 12:01:59 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War - v.1.06.00
Wed, 1 February 2023



Hi everyone,

today we are releasing the first patch after the launch of Wars in the Americas.



Here is the changelog:

GAME ENGINE
- Fixed an issue that allowed some newly deployed Naval units that are not river units, to deploy in a river hex.
- Fixed a surprised hidden enemy unit error that allowed some units to move through hidden units.
- Fixed a DLC campaign loading issue that would in some cases load incorrect customized text in game (Louie Kaboom).


EDITOR
- Placing a < symbol at the end of the #MAP_POSITION in STRENGTH scripts will allow for targeted units to be destroyed.


CAMPAIGNS

1846
- Set control of eastern Chihuahua and northern Coahuila to Comanche
- Added a second port to New Orleans LA
- Improved US AI exclsuions (Tanaka)
- Improved US AI garrison behaviour
- Improved US offensive AI behaviour (Tanaka)
- Added the settlement of Anton Lizardo VE

1870
- Added French Major Victory if France controls Coblenz (Xsillione)
- French 1st Cavalry Division will now deploy on 1870/08/03 at Nancy (was 1870/08/05 at Strasbourg) (OldCrowBalthazor)
- Chasseurs des Vosges Franc-Tireurs will now spawn in St Die if a German unit is within 7 hexes of St Die, or the date is 1870/08/28
- Added additional Franc-Tireurs locations (OldCrowBalthazor)
- Improved German AI garrison behaviour

1898
- Extended map south by 4 hexes (Edprem)
- Added a port and Spanish fort unit at Manzanillo CB
- DE 501 will now correctly appear at the end of the first US turn
- Forts now begin the campaign fully entrenched

OTHER
- Updated Strategy Guides

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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2023, 01:03:24 AM »
Strategic Command: American Civil War - 1904 Imperial Sunrise is coming soon
Tue, 13 June 2023



On June 29th, we will be releasing the 1.08 patch for Strategic Command: American Civil War.  In addition to the usual fixes and improvements, and as a way of celebrating the first anniversary of the game’s launch, this update also includes a brand new campaign, available for free to everyone who owns the game!

In this developer diary, we introduce 1904 Imperial Sunrise, covering the Russo-Japanese War.




Humbly reporting to YOUR IMPERIAL MAJESTY.  Around midnight [February 8-9th], Japanese torpedo boats undertook a sudden attack on our squadron at Port Arthur base.  The battleships Retvizan and Tsarevich and the cruiser Pallada have been ruptured; the degree of damage is being determined.
- Telegram from Viceroy Alekseyev to Tsar Nicholas II, on the first day of the war.


The story of the Russo-Japanese War began with Japan’s victory over China in 1895.  In a war lasting a mere eight months, Japan had destroyed the Chinese Navy, asserted Japanese influence over Korea, conquered Formosa and captured Port Arthur, perhaps the finest harbour in the region.  Yet the ink on the resultant Treaty of Shimonoseki had scarcely dried before Russia, with the support of France and Germany, pressured Japan to return Port Arthur to China in exchange for an enlarged war indemnity.

The Tsar, whose contempt for the Japanese dated back to an attempted assassination during an 1891 state visit to the country, had his own ambitions in the Far East.  Within a few short years, Russia had deployed thousands of soldiers in Manchuria, established and fortified the naval base at Port Arthur, and was making moves to gain influence in Korea, causing alarm in Tokyo.  When negotiations with St Petersburg stalled, the Japanese felt the only option left to them was war.



The Sun Rises

The campaign begins on the morning of February 9, 1904, and the Japanese player is immediately faced with decisions that will shape the outcome of the war.

In the Yellow Sea, Admiral Togo is stationed with the bulk of the Combined Fleet outside Port Arthur.  The previous night, Japanese torpedo boats launched a surprise attack against the Russian Pacific Fleet, damaging several ships but sinking none, and the decision must now be made regarding a second strike: the Russian defences at Port Arthur are not yet fully prepared, and the damage suffered the previous night renders them vulnerable.

However, a more cautious approach may be worth considering instead.  Port Arthur, located at the tip of the Liaodong Peninsula, is vulnerable to blockade by both land and sea.  A sustained naval presence in the Yellow Sea, supported by naval mines, may be able to trap the Russian Navy in port without the need for an immediate, and costly, battle.  Of course, this also risks the Russians attempting to fight their way out…



Japan’s greatest advantage lays in the preparations it has made before declaring war.  Lessons learned from the war against China, and extensive training since, have provided Japanese units with a significant advantage in experience, while generous recruitment of local civilians in China and Korea will provide Japan with a generally favourable supply situation and regular intelligence updates.

Challenges of Deployment

With Tokyo having realised that further negotiations with the Tsar’s government would be fruitless by the end of 1903, the Imperial Army was mobilised and ready for battle.  At the same time that Togo struck the Russian Fleet at Port Arthur, detachments of the IJA First Army were disembarking at Chemulpo, repeating a manoeuvre that had served them so well ten years prior.



These units, the 2nd and 12th Divisions, as well as General Kuroki’s headquarters, while sufficient to ensure the capitulation of the Korean government, represent merely the forward detachments for the Japanese land campaign.  The rest of the Imperial Army begins the campaign still stationed on the Home Islands, and it will be up to you to manage their deployment in Korea and Manchuria, a task that will require you to navigate shortages of transport ships, frozen harbours (at least until the ice melts), and the constant threat of Russian cruisers.

Playing as Russia, you will need to plan the deployment of your forces carefully.  While the Tsar’s army boasts more than a million soldiers (albeit lacking the quality of the Japanese army), these are deployed primarily in Europe and Central Asia, far from the likely battlefields of Manchuria.  Russia’s industrial power dwarfs that of the Japanese, but the capacity of the Trans-Siberian Railroad limits the number of men that can be sent to the Far East.

Unlike Japan, Russia’s army (excepting the 100,000 men scattered across various small garrisons in the region) does not begin deployed on the map.  Taking the place of Viceroy Alekseyev, you will need to request which units to send to the Far East via the Unit Purchase Screen.  Sending these units will take time, forcing you to plan your battles several months in advance to ensure you have sufficient men on hand when the time comes.



A Race Against Time

No matter which side you choose to command, the calendar will be your enemy.

For Japan, the reasons for this are obvious.  Going to war at all was a huge gamble by the leadership in Tokyo, as while Russia could count on nearly unlimited reserves of manpower, Japan meanwhile had virtually no reserves, and with less access to foreign markets than the Russians, it also risks financial collapse if the war drags on too long.

However, thanks to its pre-war preparations, Japan – provided the Imperial Navy can keep the supply routes to Korea open – can deploy its forces to the battlefield much more quickly than the Russians, providing them with a short-lived quantitative advantage.  Japan therefore faces a dilemma: a rapid advance offers the best chance to deal a devastating blow to the Russian military before their numbers become too overwhelming, but this will result in heavier casualties that Japan can ill afford and will erode the quality of their units: quality that may well prove the difference in battles to come.



Russia too can scarcely afford delay.  While in the long run the strength of the Russian Army in the Far East will grow to eclipse that of the Japanese, initially the Manchurian garrisons under Generals Zasulich and Kuropatkin will face an overwhelming advance, and merely 200 miles separate the Yalu River from Port Arthur, a distance the Japanese covered in just two months in 1894.

Furthermore, the prestige and reputation of the Tsar himself have been staked on the outcome of this war.  No Asian nation has ever defeated a European power in a major conflict, placing enormous pressure on Russia to win a swift and decisive victory or risk great humiliation.  With discontent growing against the Tsar’s autocratic regime, perhaps the Tsar’s interior minister said it best: “In order to prevent revolution, we need a little victorious war.”



Do You See the Torpedo Boats?

Success in this campaign will ultimately depend on your ability to achieve mastery both on land and at sea.  With expectations of victory set so high by leaders in both Tokyo and St Petersburg, your nation’s Fighting Spirit will be rapidly eroded by even small reverses – the sinking of a battleship or the capture of a mere provincial city could be the difference between triumph and disaster.

Should the Imperial Navy fail to contain the Russian fleets in Port Arthur and Vladivostok, the Russians may be able to strike at Japan’s Fighting Spirit more directly, by imposing a blockade of Japan.  By moving their warships, even for only a brief time, on or adjacent to any of the marked locations around the Japanese and Korean coastlines, Russia can disrupt Japanese trade and humiliate the Japanese Navy in a way that China never managed to in 1894.  A sustained blockade may even doom the Japanese overland campaigns, as Russian warships cut the sea routes between the Home Islands and Korea, preventing the Imperial Army from receiving reinforcements.



Or will it be the greatest reinforcement of all that determines the outcome of the war?

The Russian Baltic Fleet is perhaps this conflict’s most remarkable chapter.  Historically, the Baltic Fleet, or Second Pacific Squadron as it was officially called from mid-1904, embarked on an epic eight-month voyage halfway around the world (a journey both audacious and absurd), only to be destroyed in the Battle of Tsushima mere days before reaching their destination of Vladivostok.  In the campaign, players will be provided notifications of the Baltic Fleet’s travels around the coasts of Europe and Africa, before the ships themselves deploy on the map in May 1905.  Plan for it carefully, and the arrival of Rozhestvensky’s “miserable fleet” could be the decisive moment of the war!



“The Empire’s fate depends upon the outcome of this battle.  Let everyone do his best”
- Admiral Togo, before the Battle of Tsushima.



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Re: Strategic Command: American Civil War
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2023, 12:14:47 AM »
SC: American Civil War - 1904 Imperial Sunrise release and update 1.08.00
Thu, June 29, 2023



"It is February 1904 and Russia and Japan are at war!

This is a conflict in which neither side can afford delay. A long war for Japan means not only overwhelming numbers of Russian reinforcements, including the prestigious Baltic Fleet, but also the threat of financial collapse. The Tsar, meanwhile, has been promised an easy victory over the scorned Japanese, and failure to defeat them quickly risks not only humiliation but perhaps even revolution.

A grand battle for the control of East Asia is about to begin. Are you ready to take sides?"

We are proud to announce the release of 1904 Imperial Sunrise, a free campaign for all the owners of Strategic Command: American Civil War.

Alongside the free campaign we also release the update 1.08.00

You can download the update here

Here is the full changelog:

GAME ENGINE
- Fixed an upgrade tool error that would sometimes allow you to upgrade resources beyond available MPPs (Jkap).
- Fixed an issue where towns would sometimes change control, despite not entering or formally gaining control of the town, after being attacked by a unit that moved first before attacking (Chernobyl).
- Land units will now be surprised by an enemy naval unit that is located on a Land + Sea hex (Tanaka).
- Coastal Guns will now fire back at attacking naval units (archmache).

EDITOR
- Units set to a default of zero action points in the Editor can no longer transport.
- Enemy ZoC movement penalty values can now be separately set for land and naval units in the Movement Costs screen.

CAMPAIGNS
1866
- Fixed naval zone error making hex 34,41 impassable
- Fixed weather zones around map boundaries
- Hexes 17,54 and 17,58 now sea hexes instead of land+sea
- Hex 26,38 now a land/Carrizal hex instead of land+sea, allows the fortress there to fire correctly (Edprem)
- Corrected name of the Neembucu River

1870
- Campaign now grouped with ACW release campaigns in the selection menu to make clearer the distinction between DLC and non-DLC campaigns

1879
- DE 1 (Chile Declare Major Victory) will only fire if Peru still controls Lima
- DE 2 (Peru Declare Major Victory) will only fire if Chile still controls Santiago

1898
- Fixed minor translation error (xavi_san_lla)

1904
- Added '1904 Imperial Sunrise' campaign

All CW Campaigns
- Fixed location error for the Union Capture of Shreveport FS event (Mithrilotter)
- Mobility research will no longer show as an upgrade for Siege Artillery (Mithrilotter)
- Fixed the location of Valley Forge (jimpyle)
- Corrected route of the Appomattox River (jimpyle)
- Union War Weariness increased to 400 FS points per turn (was 200) (Scum)
- Each border/Southern state capital, marked with blue stars, now provides 25 FS points to its owner each turn (Scum)
- Railroad at Dover TN now connected to the line immediately south of the town (Tanaka)

OTHER
- Updated Strategy Guides

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