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Desert War: 1940-42
« on: May 15, 2017, 06:54:33 PM »


"Of all theatres of operations, it was probably in North Africa that the war took on its most advanced form. The protagonists on both sides were fully motorized formations, for whose employment the flat and obstruction-free desert offered hitherto undreamed-of possibilities. It was the only theatre where the principles of motorized and tank warfare, as they had been taught theoretically before the war, could be applied to the full-and further developed. It was the only theatre where the pure tank battle between major formations was fought." -- Field Marshall Erwin Rommel


Product page: Here
Official forum: Here


Manual: PDF
Editor: Yes. Full game editor
Theatre: Africa
Turns: Turn-Based WEGO
Unit Scale: Operational
AI: Yes
PBEM: Yes, Server Based


About This Game

Brian Kelly’s Desert War: 1940-42 captures the drama of the campaign for North Africa during World War II. 
 
This is an operational level, ground-centric wargame that recreates the epic tank battles fought between the Axis and Allies for possession of Libya and Egypt. 
 
It consists of a series of historical and “What-if” scenarios that allow the players to explore the ebb and flow of the actual conflict.


Features

•   Re-discover surprise on the battlefield!  The WEGO game system makes for great fun and realistic game play.
•   12 scenarios that explore the action from the Italian Invasion of Egypt in 1940 to Rommel's defeat at El Alamein in late 1942.
•   Control land, air and naval forces at the battalion, air group, and individual ship level.
•   Allocate Command, Special Forces and electronic warfare (EW) assets to influence the battles.
•   Simple on-line gameplay using Slitherine's PBEM system.
•   Full game editor; build your own maps, forces, and graphics.  Includes an AI scripting language that provides a challenging AI opponent capable of "changing its mind" based on the human player's actions.
 
Scenario List:
•   Operazione E: The Reluctant Offensive, 13-20 Sep 1940
•   Into The Blue: Battle of Sidi Barrani, 9-12 Dec 1940
•   Beda Fomm: Death of an Army, 1-7 Feb 1941
•   Enter Rommel: Advance to Tobruk, 31 Mar-12 Apr 1941
•   Battle of Sollum: Operation Battleaxe, 15-18 Jun 1941
•   Sunday of the Dead: Battle of Sidi Rezegh, 18-24 Nov 1941
•   Rats vs The Ram: Battle of Bir el Gubi, 19-21 Nov 1941
•   Gazala--First Five Days, 26-30 May 1942
•   Gazala--The Cauldron, 29 May - 10 Jun 1942
•   Gazala--Fall of Tobruk, 11 - 21 Jun 1942
•   High Tide at Alam Halfa, 30 Aug - 5 Sep 1942
•   2nd Alamein: From Lightfoot to Supercharge, 24 Oct - 3 Nov 1942











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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2017, 02:11:48 PM »
Desert War Beta Recruitment is started!


Fellow wargamers, if you can’t wait to challenge yourself in desert warfare, then we have a news for you!

Desert War 1940 – 1942 is about to enter its beta testing phase, and we ask players to help us in important stage!

If you are of a mind to contribute to polishing the game, then look no further and apply by clicking here!

From the product page:

“Desert War is an operational level, ground-centric wargame that recreates the epic tank battles fought between the Axis and Allies for possession of Libya and Egypt.

 It consists of a series of historical and “What-if” scenarios that allow the players to explore the ebb and flow of the actual conflict.”








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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2017, 06:01:55 PM »
Desert War Main Art Revealed!


The Desert War developers are proud to reveal the Main Art for their upcoming wargame set in North Africa, during the first years of the Second World War!

In Desert War, nothing is left to chance. From taking care of the supply system to facing enemy raids, you will be constantly on alert.

Be ready to outsmart your adversary, as you plan your next move at his same time, thanks to the innovative WEGO system!

Desert War captures completely the dramatic nature of the desert warfare, where every single unit is precious like water, and mobility is to be prized over fixed defences!

Get more information about the game from its official product page!


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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2017, 01:53:35 PM »


We have received a new set of screenshots about our upcoming wargame Desert War, featuring the starting points of the main scenarios available in the game!

Browse between“Operazione E”, “The Battle of Sollum, “The Fall of Tobruk” up to “Operation Supercharge”, and discover plenty of tactical options you’ll have at disposal!























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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2017, 04:25:02 PM »
Desert War - Interview with Devs


Matrix had the chance to catch up with Desert War 1940 – 1942[url] developer, Brian Kelly.

Matrix: First off, thanks for this occasion and congratulations on the work so far. The game looks very interesting! Is it your first title?
Brian Kelly: Yes. My day job is programming in java, so I decided to try writing a wargame, instead of just playing them.

M: The theatre of operation depicted is, undoubtedly, unique. Could you tell us more about your choice? What fascinates you about this kind of warfare in North Africa?
B.K.: I've been interested in the North African campaign since I read The Desert Generals by Correlli Barnett years ago. I was fascinated by the little known but devastating attack by General O'Connor against the Italians, the to-and-fro actions, sea-sawing across North Africa, the colourful cast of characters, and the fact that it was generally a "War Without Hate" (as John Bierman's book on the theatre is called).

M: And which aspects were you determined to recreate in your game?
B.K.: I wanted to do a game with large maps, relatively low unit counter density, and the ability to do sweeping manoeuvre. Of course, not every battle in North African had those aspects, and so we've tried to create a mix of scenarios to reflect this.
Secondly, I think combining Fog Of War and WEGO (where both sides move simultaneously) can help replicate some of the chaos and confusion of the real battles. When reading about the Desert War, it's remarkable how little the generals of either side knew of what was happening; neither side knew the location of the enemy, and in many cases didn't even know their own location. This is why reconnaissance is very important in the game. Air and EW assets can be used as recon, as well as ground units. Ground Units have different recon range and strengths. Ground Recce units are the best of course, and like real recon units, will try and avoid combat. they should be more than just weak infantry; they should be vital.
Including scenarios only involving the Italians versus Commonwealth forces was important too, so four of the scenarios occur before the arrival of Rommel.

M: Desert War has a very nice “board game” feeling! What have been your main sources of inspiration? Have you ever played The Campaign for North Africa (1979), War in the Desert (1997), Tobruk: Tank Battles in North Africa 1942 (1975) or other tabletop wargames?
B.K.: Unfortunately, due to lack of local opponents, my board gaming today mainly consists of games like Ticket To Ride!

M: What about computer wargames, have any of these inspired you?
B.K.: Mainly Panzer Campaigns and Atomic's World At War games Stalingrad and Operation Crusader. The Atomic games were the original WEGO wargames and even though released in the early 90s they're still very good.

M: How much time went into the historical research for designing the scenarios and what element do you think you have been able to depict in the most accurate form in particular?
B.K.: Two of our researchers spent the better part of a year assembling all the data on weapon systems, doctrine, supply systems, unit organizations, orders of battle for air, land and sea forces, and the initial dispositions for the various scenarios.

M: Let’s talk a bit about gameplay mechanics. We know that Desert War will employ a WEGO system rather than of a more classical IGOYUGO. How does this approach better suit the game’s scope? Will the players spend a lot of time in movement planning?
B.K.: Playing in the IGOYUGO game, you order units to move and they always move where you want them to, and if they do not, you know immediately and can alter your plan to account for this. In WWII it was of course not like that, units might not move to due Command and Control problems, enemy Air interdiction, or bumping into enemy units you didn't know existed. Like in the real Desert War, one can plan ones moves, but that is no guarantee the plan will survive contact with the enemy. And it may take hours (6 hours in Desert War's case) so the commander to have his plans adjusted. The WEGO system also allows for a distinction between "set-piece" attacks at the start of the turn and risky on-the-fly attacks during the move phase.
If the player wants to win, they'll be spending a lot of time in the movement planning.

M: There are a lot of elements to Desert War, what would you suggest are the key aspects for the player to focus on?
B.K.: Reconnaissance. Find the enemy, find his flank, then pile on.
Organizations. Maintain organizational integrity to the extent possible; the penalties for failing to do this can be quite painful.
Supplies. Keep units within the support range of their higher headquarters.  Supported units are the only units that benefit from Move Plus and Combat Plus supply expenditures.
Reserves. Don't throw everybody into the fight.  Fresh troops can win the day when tired troops only suffer casualties.
Air Game. Finding the right balance between reconnaissance, counter-air, interdiction, ground support, and aircrew rest can be a game-changer.  Pay close attention to the effects of air forces on the land battle.

M: One of the most distinctive things about the confrontation in North Africa was the management of the supply lines and the logistics. How is this element depicted in the game? Can we raid enemy lines?
B.K.: Supply lines can be interdicted and fuel and ammo points can be destroyed using air, naval, and special forces assets (SAS, LRDG, Brandenburgers).
Interdiction also reduces HQ supply range and unit movement points.

M: I know that Desert War is ground-centered, but is the naval aspect of the war in North Africa covered in some way? What about the planned – but never occurred – Operation Herkules?
B.K.: Naval assets are present in several scenarios.  These assets represent individual ships capable of attacking ground units on their own or supporting the defense or attacks of friendly ground units.
Operation Herkules is not covered in this game.

M: In many wargames (especially in operational ones), you really have to think three moves ahead, countering all the measures your opponent will make. How hard has it been creating an AI capable of adapting to this particular kind of warfare?
B.K.: The AI scripting engine is designed to support that sort of thinking by the scenario designer.  The scenario designer examines the historical situation for a side (mission, enemy, terrain, friendly troops available, scenario length, etc.).  Based on that analysis, he scripts courses of action in response to his assessment of potential enemy courses of action.   For example, assuming the AI recce is doing its job, if the human enemy attacks in the north—execute reaction x.  If the human enemy attacks in the south—execute reaction y.   
In addition, ground units have embedded AI behaviors that provide for their self-defense, combat avoidance, defensible terrain selection, etc.

M: And what other development challenges have you faced?
B.K.: The "Film Making" for the WEGO was the hardest challenge, combining two separate sets of orders into a single film. It's working now, but I wouldn't like to have to do it all over again!

M: Among the 11 historical scenarios to play, are there any “What if “ situation the players could find themselves in?
B.K.: Many of the scenarios allow the player to change the initial historical set-up for his side.  For example, in Gazala: The First Five Days, the Axis Player is free to set-up anywhere he wants west of the Gazala line.  So instead of following Rommel's plan, the Axis player could attack along the coast road to Tobruk, or try the soft center between the 150th Brigade Box and the Free French at Bir Hacheim.

M: Are you planning to expand the setting to include 1943 and Operation Torch?
B.K.: We'll have to wait and see.

M: And finally Rommel or Montgomery? Who for you was the greater general – or do you have a 3rd suggestion?
B.K.: Well, that has to be General Richard O'Connor, who showed his flair for armoured warfare as the architect of the rout of the Italians during Operation Compass. For the loss of only 500 killed, O'Connor managed to destroy the Italian 10th Army and gave Churchill a chance to end the war in North Africa in 1941 (unfortunately O'Connor forces were shipped off to be defeated in Greece). O'Connor was captured by the Germans on 6th April 1941, and with that the British Army had to endure a succession lesser generals, some (Auchinleck) a lot better than others (Ritchie).


This covers everything we had to ask to the developers of Desert War, let us know if you have any more questions.

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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2018, 08:48:55 PM »
Desert War – Axis and Allies Army Organizations (OOBs)



As the development of Desert War is progressing very fast, we want to reveal a bit more about some of the most iconic battles you’ll have to fight.

Check out the Army Organizations of both the Axis and the Allies during Operation Crusader, the Battle of Gazala and El-Alamein!

Stay tuned for further updates and information. Check the official Desert War Product Page.












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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2018, 05:05:33 PM »
Desert War release date!



Mark the date, as you’ll be able to ride your tanks through the stormy sands of North Africa very soon.

Desert War, the upcoming wargame set in the early years of World War II in Libya and featuring the clashes between the Italo-German Army and the British-led forces, will hit your shelves on March 22nd!

In the meantime, check out this thrilling AAR “Gazala: The First 5 Days... DAR and notes”, where bootlegger267 will be challenged by a very competitive AI.

Stay tuned for further updates!


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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2018, 02:48:47 PM »
Desert War Mechanics: Tanks Explained



The combat power of armor units changes over time in Desert War 1940-42.  This is due to the fact that tables of organization (TO&E), armor thickness, gun size and the penetration capability of anti-tank ammunition changed as the war progressed.  Here is a sampling of the impacts of those changes on how armor battalions are represented across time in Desert War:

This is the full set for the Italian Army:
 


Attack and defense factors for Armor units were based upon the capabilities of their guns and ammunition and their armor thickness, angles of attack, etc. For example:




This is the full set for the German Army:






The following is a representation of the multitude of different British tank battalion organizations that existed between 1940-42:




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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2018, 02:56:39 PM »
Desert War Mechanics: Shock Explained



“Everyone was talking and chatting, when slowly came into sight the first tank I ever saw.  Not a monster but a very graceful machine with beautiful lines….  Here was the missing tool of penetration, the answer to the dominance on the battlefield of small-arms fire.”— J.F.C. Fuller

DESERT WAR:  SHOCK EXPLAINED

Matrix Games/Slitherine’s upcoming release of Brian Kelly’s Desert War 1940-42 uses a simple game mechanic often found in WWII board games.  It gives tank units a “special place” in the player’s toolbox—a positive shift to the combat force ratio if attacking, and the opposite when defending.  Coming up short of attack factors?  No problem!  Throw in some tanks.  A 1 to 1 attack can become a 2 to 1, 3 to 1, 4 to 1, etc.  In Desert War 1940-42, we call this mechanic—Shock.

Shock
So…how did armored forces create this “shock” effect during the early stages of WWII?  Simply put, they employed speed, unexpected directions of attack (especially from the flank and rear), and overwhelming firepower at the decisive point to destroy (kill, capture, or cause to cower) units within the enemy’s command--which in turn reduced, eliminated, or frustrated the options available to the enemy commander.
How did we model it in Desert War 1940-42?  In three ways. Successful mechanized force commanders employ three key ingredients to achieve victory on the battlefield—rapid mobility, overwhelming firepower, and shock/surprise.  Desert War strives to replicate these ingredients and their interactions in game play.

Rapid Mobility
“The primary mission of armored units is the attacking of infantry and artillery.  The enemy’s rear is the happy hunting ground for armor; use every means to get it there.”—General George S. Patton
The movement factor assigned to each unit type depends on whether the unit is mechanized or not.  What defines a mechanized unit?  If it moves using gasoline or diesel—it’s mechanized.  From the perspective of North Africa in WWII, we are talking about combat units like reconnaissance, mechanized infantry, motorized infantry, armor, and the combat support units (artillery, anti-tank, anti-aircraft, etc.) assigned to armored and motorized infantry divisions/brigades.  Table 1 below shows the mobility type of the units found in the game.  How fast can they go?  When supplied with fuel points, all units within a mechanized organization are assigned a movement factor of 12 or 15.
On the other hand, if it moves by foot, hoof or slithers on its belly like a reptile—it is non-mechanized.  In this category, Desert War has two participants—leg infantry and parachute infantry.  There are no cavalry units, and nothing is horse-drawn.  When supplied, leg infantry divisions and parachute infantry brigades, plus their combat support units have a movement factor of 8.
There are a few exceptions to the rule based on unit functionality.  Reconnaissance units have a movement factor of 18.  This enhances their ability to perform their primary role—which is to observe and report the location, size, and activity of enemy forces—while avoiding contact.  Army and Theater HQs will generally have a movement factor of 4 or less.  This represents the difficulty of changing a line of operations while combat operations are in progress.
Thus, the movement factor of mechanized forces provides them superior mobility—nearly one and a half to twice as much as leg infantry.  They can get in fast—and get out faster.  In addition, mechanized forces can use their large movement advantage to move through weak zones of control to penetrate the enemy’s defenses.  This provides the opportunity to outflank (+1 shift to the combat odds) or surround (+2 shift to the combat odds) the enemy’s infantry defenses or drive deep and attack his artillery and HQ units.



Table 1:  Unit Mobility and Shock Value


Firepower
“As we approached the coast we saw before us a mass of men, lorries, guns, and a few tanks, and we were on them before they knew what had hit them.  There were so many targets I hardly knew which to engage first.  Milligan [the tank’s gunner] was having the time of his life, and even the young sub-turret gunners with their machine guns were getting rid of belts of ammunition at an alarming rate.  For a while the Italians fought back, but then white handkerchiefs and scarves began to appear in all directions.  We stopped firing and closed in on them.”— Major Rea Leakey, 1st Royal Tank Regiment, describing the Battle of Sidi Barrani

It’s not just mobility; you need to “get there first with the most” firepower—the more the better.  Within the game, this translates to obtaining a favorable combat ratio—up to 10 to1 on the ground combat result table.  This ratio is obtained by comparing the combined attack factors with the combined defense factors of the enemy units found in the hex under attack.  In the tables below, we can get an idea of what to expect from a tank battalion attacking an enemy infantry battalion.



Table 2: Comparison of Tank Battalions by Country


In the examples above in Table 2, we see that in 1941, the range of attack factors assigned to tank battalions is between 10 and 18 attack points; the Italians having the lowest and the Germans having the highest.  Table 3 shows that the defense strength of infantry battalions ranges between 13 and 22; again, the lowest is the Italians and the highest is the Germans.


Table 3: Comparison of Infantry Battalions by Country


Now let’s compare the information from Table 2 and 3 to see how things will be during actual game play.  The following table pairs the various armor battalions against the infantry battalions they might face on the battlefield.  We can see that the German Panzer Battalion and the British Crusader Battalion can attack at 1 to 1 combat odds, while the rest can do no better than 1 to 2.  In any case, these odds are a bit tenuous to say the least.  So…I think it’s time to throw in a little Shock action to spice things up a bit.




Table 4:  Basic Odds for 1941 Armor Bn vs Infantry Bn



“The capture of Mechili was a coup; the enemy had probably not reckoned on our using the route through Ben Gania or on our appearing as early as we did in front of Mechili.  Thus their troops were taken completely by surprise….”— Field Marshal Irwin Rommel

Shock – General Rules
Ground units with a Shock Value (see Table 1) can shift combat odds of an attack in favor of the owning side.  Shock Values are displayed in the Unit Details Panel.  Armor, mechanized infantry, and anti-tank units have a Shock Value of 2 or 4.  Units with a Shock Value of 0 are considered “shock neutral”; their stacking points don’t count when calculating the Shock Percentage—that’s a good thing.  Foot-mobile infantry have no Shock Value; their stacking points DO count when calculating the Shock Percentage—that’s a bad thing.

Shock only applies to attacks against an enemy in open terrain (i.e. the hex itself has no defensive bonus—like desert).  Likewise, units that are attacking over a non-clear terrain hexside (e.g. a gully) have no Shock Value.

The Shock Percentage is calculated for the Attacker and Defender.  To determine a side’s Shock Percentage, find the friendly unit of those engaged with the highest Shock Value.  Reduce this value by the percentage of stacking points that have no Shock Value (i.e. non-mechanized, foot mobile infantry).

Shock Values are halved if the unit has:
•   Readiness less than 30%
•   Strength less than 30%
•   Line of Communication State is Encircled or Isolated

Shock Values are 0 if the unit has:
•   Readiness less than 10%
•   Strength less than 10%

The Final Shock is the Attacker Shock Value minus the Defender Shock Value.  If the result is positive, then the attack odds are increased by that number of shifts.  If the result is negative, then the attack odds are reduced by that number of shifts.

For example:
Example 1

An attack consists of:
•   an armored (Shock 4) unit of stacking size 4
•   a motorized (Shock 0) unit of stacking size 2
•   an infantry (No Shock) unit of stacking size 2

The maximum shock value of any unit in this attack = 4 (from the armored unit).
The stacking size of shock units (the armored and Motorized unit) = 6
The total stacking size of all units = 8
The percentage of shock units = 75% (6 as a percentage of 8).
75% of the maximum shock value (4) = 3
If the defender has no shock value, the Final Attacker Shock = +3 combat odds shifts.

Example 2

An attack consists of:
•   an armored (Shock 4) unit of stacking size 1
•   an infantry (No Shock) unit of stacking size 3
Then the final Shock = 1 (25% of attacking stack has Shock, 25% of the max shock 4 = 1).

Example 3
An attack consists of:
•   2 armored (Shock 4) units of Stacking size 1
•   1 of the 2 units is attacking over a gully hexside.

Then the final Shock = 2 (50% of attacking stack has Shock – the unit attacking over the gully is considered to have No Shock. 50% of the max shock 4 = 2).

Counter-shock
How do you counter Shock effects in the game?  Avoid sitting in clear terrain if you can…in the desert.  Dig-in and hold on to your helmet.  Try to keep non-clear terrain hex sides (gullies, rivers, minefields, etc.) between you and the enemy’s tanks.   Tank and antitank (AT) units are good—“counter shock”—weapons.  They can reduce or neutralize an attacker’s Shock, so stack with your own tanks or AT guns to help take some of the steam out of the roller.  It should be noted that AT do not have an attack Shock greater than 0.  However, to reflect the long range of the 88mm AA/AT guns, German Heavy AT units can “attack” with a Shock Value of 2.

The Wrap-up
Now that we have the Shock capability tucked away in our kit bag, let’s take another look at those “tenuous”, low-odds situations involving armor battalions vs infantry battalions.  As we’ve now learned, every one of the attacking tank battalions listed in Table 4 gets a +4 shift to the initial combat odds—the enemy infantry battalions have either 0 Shock Value or No Shock at all.  Table 5 shows how those attack odds look with Shock shifts applied.  Four and five to one sounds a lot better.  Now—if you reinforce these tank battalion attacks with some motorized infantry, a brass-up by the artillery (all 0 shock value units so they don’t count against you), some air assets and a flanking attack—that’s a devastating attack!  Or dare I say—shocking!


If all this sounds interesting to you, then check out Desert War 1940-42 when it hits the digital store shelves on a computer near you.

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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2018, 03:46:39 PM »
Desert War Tutorial Guide


Training is fondamental. Without that, even the best eqipped troops can be prey of a better prepared enemy. You must know your own troops, their potential and limits.
 
As a commander, you must adapt your plan to un expected situations and quickly, because time is essential and the more you wait the more chances you are leaving to the enemy to exploit your mistakes.
 
This is even truer in desert warfare, where the harsh environment conditions have a direct impact on communication, movement and more.
This is why we are very proud to give you an important tool for your future assignment: the Desert War Tutorial Guide, written and assembled by user and beta tester John “Slick Wilhelm” Dahlen.
 
This Guide will be a very important instrument for you (although it doesn't replace the manual) as there you can find precious tips and explanation on how make best use of your assets.
 
Click on the banner below to start reading! And Kudos to John “Slick Wilhelm” Dahlen for the excellent work!
 
Desert War: 1940 - 42 will be out on March, 22nd. Get more information from its official product page


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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2018, 02:50:21 PM »



1940. While in Europe the German war machine seems unstoppable, in the desert of North Africa the British and its Commonwealth Allies are not willing to concede an easy victory to the Axis. Italian forces - even if initially numerically superior - are not adequately trained or equipped for a prolonged war in such environment, and soon they send request for aid to avoid complete defeat. Berlin answers to the call, and a blocking force led by General Erwin Rommel is organized and dispatched to the Libyan shores.

Now, the day has come. Are you ready for Desert War?

Desert War: 1940 - 1942 is an operational level, ground-centric wargame that recreates the epic tank battles fought between the Axis and Allies for possession of Libya and Egypt.

In this wargame, you’ll have the chance to relive the key battles that exalted mechanized warfare in North Africa, where nothing can be left to chance.

Be ready to outsmart your adversary, as you plan your moves simultaneously, thanks to the innovative WEGO system! Will you wait for reinforcements, leaving the initiative to the enemy or will you try to exploit his mistakes, possibly risking your entire frontline?

Make best use of your Air, Naval, and Ground Assets to turn the tide of battle at your favor!

Get more information about Desert War 1940 – 1942 from its official product page!

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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2018, 03:33:24 PM »
Live stream today @16:00 GMT

https://www.twitch.tv/slitherinegroup

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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2018, 02:32:08 AM »
I figured this (and any sequels) should go here, since the game properly already has a thread.  :thumbsup

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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2018, 01:13:23 AM »
I saw that you have this game, Asid. Would you like to take the Italians against me on Operation E, as I'm doing the AAR?
Mp Decisive Campaigns: Blitzkrieg videos (finished)

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Re: Desert War: 1940-42
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2018, 12:01:39 PM »
I saw that you have this game, Asid. Would you like to take the Italians against me on Operation E, as I'm doing the AAR?

Thank you for the offer but it's not possible right now.

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